Vacation leave entitlement

On October 22, 2011, in Working Time and Leave, by Kalina Jaroslawska

Summer and vacation time are already over so you might think that this is not a good time to write about vacation leave. Well, perhaps not, but today the weather in my home town was so beautiful and it was so astonishingly warm that I thought about holiday. Because of the “holiday link”, vacation leave is one of the most pleasant areas of labour law, so why not give it some attention?

Vacation leave for all employees

Polish Labour Code provides for annual continuous and paid vacation leave for all employees. The employee may not waive the right to paid vacation leave. In particular, vacation leave may not be exchanged for money (save for one exception related to termination of the employment contract).

How much vacation leave am I entitled to?

Vacation leave entitlement depends on the employee’s overall length of employment so far and years of education. As for education, the greatest credit is given for university education, which counts as 8 years of employment. And so:

  • employees with total length of employment of up to 10 years are entitled to 20 days of vacation leave;
  • empployees with total length of employment of at least 10 years are entitled to 26 days of vacation leave.
The statutory vacation leave entitlement may be extended by the parties to the employment contract, but it may not be shortened. In other words, Polish Labour Code provides for a statutory minimum. Other labour related provisions may equip certain categories of employees with longer statutory vacation leave entitlement, e.g. working minors, teachers, judges, prosecutors, firefighters.
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The blog has a new name – Polish Labour Law Blog

On October 12, 2011, in General, by Kalina Jaroslawska

As you have noticed, the blog changed its name to the Polish Labour Law Blog.

Why is that?

The Polish Employment Law Blog has been online for about 9 months now. During that time I have given some thought to its formula and deliberated on which one is the best for the readers. As a result, I decided to focus mostly on labour law in Poland rather then employment matters, which is a wider term and covers a number of issues not of interest to the users (as I suppose, based on the instruments that I could use). From now on the the blog will be labelled as Polish Labour Law Blog (although the domain will stay as it was for a couple of months) and concentrate on those aspects on Polish labour law which are regulated in the Polish Labour Code, i.e.:

  • wage management;
  • non compete agreements and employees’ competitive activity;
  • liability for loss or damages caused by the employee to the employer;
  • work time, leaves and parents’ rights;
  • employers’ offences against employees.
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Polish labour law

On October 2, 2011, in General, by Kalina Jaroslawska

Have you ever had to do with Polish labour law? Probably not but since there are many US and UK based companies opening their branch offices in Poland there is a chance you may soon have to deal with it, especially if you are an employer representative.

If that’s the case, the first and foremost piece of legislation related to Polish law labour law that you need to look into is the Polish labour code. The Polish labour code will tell you:

  • how to conclude an employment contract and how to terminate it,
  • how to manage wages,
  • what are employee and employer statutory duties,
  • how you can prevent employee competitive activity via non compete agreements,
  • when the employee is liable for damage or loss caused to you,
  • what you need to know about work time, leaves and parents’ rights,
  • whether you can employ a minor,
  • what safe and healthy measures you need to take in your workplace,
  • how to go about union agreements (barganing agreements),
  • when you may be charged with an offense against an employee.

For some more detailed issues you may need to look into specific pieces of legislation. For example, if you require information on mass layoffs, you will have to get familiar with the Collective Dismissals Act.

Photo: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/601967

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